The following artical appeared in Television and Shortwave World magazine in December 1937.


1926-1937 THE EVOLUTION OF DESIGN
AS EXEMPLIFIED IN THE BAIRD TELEVISION RECEIVERS

Baird television receivers provide the only historical
survey in the world of design extending over a period
of more than ten years.

Some Baird receivers, 1926-1933 [17K]

1926.

THE historic television receiver with which Mr. Baird gave a demonstration to members of the Royal Institution January 27, 1926, showing the transmission of real images between one room and another by television. This was the first time in the world that real television had been shown.

1928.

Large model Baird disc receiver employing a flat plate neon lamp and 24-in. diameter disc having 30 aper- tures arranged in a spiral trace around the periphery. The vision and sound receiver was accommo- dated in the table on which the television set was resting.

1929.

Portable disc receiver employing a smaller type of neon lamp and disc than the 1928 model. This set was used by Mr. Barton-Chappie for the first provincial reception of television, pictures being demonstrated in Bradford on October 1929.

1930.

This disc model receiver was shown for the first time at the 1930 Radiolympia Exhibition.

1931.

A receiver using a mirror drum scanner in conjunction with a hot cathode type neon lamp. The reconstructed picture was projected on to a screen at the front of the set.

1932.

The commercial model disc receiver using automatic synchronising which had a large sale to the public for use during the B.B.C. low-definition transmissions.

1933.

First mirror drum and grid cell form of receiver giving a back projected picture 9 in. by 4 in.

Some Baird receivers, 1934 to 1937 [18K]

1934.

      (a) Large type mirror drum receiver giving a picture 14 in. by 6 in. similar to that installed in the listening room at Broadcasting House.
  (b) The commercial mirror drum and grid cell receiver developed from the 1933 model. The picture size was 9 in. by 4 in., being viewed on a translucent telescopic screen at the front.

1935.

These two cathode-ray tube receivers were used by the Baird Company during the long series of high-definition television demonstrations which were conducted by them during 1934 and 1935. The signals were transmitted from the studios and laboratories at the Crystal Palace; one receiver gave a picture 12 in. by 9 in., and the other 8 in. by 6 in.

1936.

Baird Television Receiver, Model T5, giving a brilliant black and white picture 12 in. by 9 in. produced on a "Cathovisor" cathode-ray tube itself a Baird product. This was the largest picture obtainable on a commercial television receiver, being designed to receive the television programmes radiated from the Alexandra Palace, London.

1937.

      (a) Baird Television receiver, Model TII, giving an outstanding brilliant black and white picture 10 in. by 8 in. viewed directly on the horizontally mounted 12 in. diameter "Cathovisor " cathode-ray tube. The receiver provides excellent picture detail, high fidelity sound, adequate angle of vision and splendid all-wave radio reception.
  (b) Baird receiver, Model T13, giving a brilliant black and white picture 13½in. by 10¾in in., produced on a "Cathovisor " cathode-ray tube. This model represents the latest technical achievement in combined television and radio entertainment for the home. Housed in the handsome walnut cabinet is a luxury television receiver, a high-fidelity all-wave radiogram with automatic record changer capable of playing records of any size in any order.
  (c) Baird Receiver, Model T12, giving a brilliant black and white picture 13½in. by 10¾in., viewed in a hinged part-mirrored lid, a 15in. diameter "Cathovisor " cathode-ray tube being mounted vertically in the cabinet. This picture is the largest yet shown on this type of Baird cathode-ray tube. The receiver also incorporates an all-wave broadcast receiver.

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